How To Incorporate Hypnotic Humor

Last week we covered how to get the BEST volunteers for your stage hypnosis show. Now I’m going to help you incorporate the best type of humor for whatever venue books you.

 

 

***Let’s Review***

 

 

If you happened to miss our very first official free training lesson on Stage Hypnosis, simply scroll down this page to click on the “PREVIOUS” lesson tab to catch yourself up!

 

 

***Venue-Appropriate Humor***

 

 

That’s right, as this section’s title states, you need to ensure that you have the most appropriate type of humor for whatever venue you’re performing for

I experienced this first hand over a year ago when performing for a High School After Prom out west. A few of the jokes were mature innuendos. While I & several of the other organizers understood these jokes weren’t anything the kids haven’t thought of/joked about themselves before, one organizer wasn’t very pleased.

As they put it to me over the phone the following afternoon, I believe she labeled some of my jokes as “bit edgy”. Again, however, the students (who the show is primarily for) as well as numerous other parents agreed none of it was THAT inappropriate for the age range present.

Nevertheless, i found out through one of the students who (among numerous others) wanted me back the following year, the staff cut my annual ties and hired another hypnotist. As a coincidental side note, the students that wanted me back disliked the new guy as they said he was rude & less enjoyable.

At the end of the day, despite it all being for “the kids”, just proves that your impression on the one directing/organizing is the biggest indicator of whether or not you’ll be brought back. Thus, venue-appropriate humor is a very real precaution to take.

 

 

***Taking Precaution***

 

 

 

This is incredibly easy to avoid for any show you managed to get booked for. I’ve even done the following for the college orientation shows I’ve already hosted/am preparing to host. Simply call up the director/organizer and ask:

  1. What are the language barriers for this venue?
  2. What are sensitive topics to avoid with this group?
  3. What type of humor should be avoided (ex: Taboo, sexual, etc)

While I’m only providing three basic examples here, these are actually the real-life questions I’m asking my high-paying clients (High Schools, Colleges, Private Clients, Otherwise). From these, I’m sure you can tap into your common sense to develop a few more safe-guard questions to ensure things are koser!

Remember, your client will respect your wanting to respect them, their guests and their venue. Coming forward to make sure these types of things are customized to their liking will show you actually care about them, their guests and their venue which they will appreciate and remember for future reference.

 

This week’s video demonstration shows how innuendos effect different venues…

 

***CONCLUSION***

 

 

Always be sure to touch base with your client at least a week, if not more, before your performance to cover various details of your show. The more you question them on what is/isn’t ok and get their approval on various ideas you might find intriguing/funny, they more they’ll appreciate your transparency for wanting to help them host a memorably hypnotic time!

Please also note, if you’re someone who thought I did cross the line during the High School show, the only reason I used that clip for this lesson (as well as on my Jon Wayes YouTube channel for entertainment) is because the young lady gave me the OK to do so. She even confronted me post-show (and was confronted by others) and at no point did expressed any concern regarding the situation, she actually thought it was funny.

Remember, this is only PART of my new-age approach to comedy stage hypnosis. If you want my upcoming Stage Hypnosis Training before it’s release later next month, simply *CLICK HERE* & I’ll be pumped to have you on the VIP wait list (3 students currently on board)!

 

P.S.
As always, *CLICK HERE* for your FREE eBook/Basic Hypnosis Trainings/Mentorship 🙂